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Fatal Caryospora bigenetica (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) Infections in Cotton Rats, Sigmodon hispidus

David S. Lindsay, Christine A. Sundermann, Byron L. Blagburn, Steve J. Upton and Susan M. Barnard
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 74, No. 5 (Oct., 1988), pp. 838-841
DOI: 10.2307/3282263
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3282263
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Fatal Caryospora bigenetica (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) Infections in Cotton Rats, Sigmodon hispidus
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Abstract

Four groups of cotton rats, Sigmodon hispidus, were shown to be suitable secondary hosts for the viperid coccidium, Caryospora bigenetica, following oral inoculation of a mixture of oocysts and sporocysts. Swelling of the face, ears, and scrota and hemorrhagic ears were the predominant clinical signs and some cotton rats died in 3 of 4 experiments. Developmental stages of C. bigenetica were found in connective tissue components of the ear, nose, cheeks, anal skin, scrotum, and penile sheath of all cotton rats in which these tissues were examined. Additionally, developmental stages of C. bigenetica were found in connective tissue components of the following tissues examined from some cotton rats: tongue, lung, testicle, epididymis, rectum, base of the tail, footpad, and bone marrow. The present study shows that C. bigenetica can be pathogenic for cotton rats and demonstrates many new anatomic sites for developmental stages of this parasite in the secondary host.

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