Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Trichinella spiralis in an Agricultural Ecosystem: Transmission in the Rat Population

David A. Leiby, Charles H. Duffy, K. Darwin Murrell and Gerhard A. Schad
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 76, No. 3 (Jun., 1990), pp. 360-364
DOI: 10.2307/3282667
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3282667
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Trichinella spiralis in an Agricultural Ecosystem: Transmission in the Rat Population
Preview not available

Abstract

Four hundred forty-three Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) were examined to determine their role in the transmission and maintenance of Trichinella spiralis on a pig farm. Rats, classified by sex and weight, were examined for trichinellosis by peptic digestion of muscle samples. Over a 25-mo period, 188 (42.4%) rats were found to be infected with T. spiralis. The mean intensity of infection was 293.2 larvae per gram (LPG) of muscle; 65 (34.6%) infected rats had intensities of infection > 100 LPG. Even in the absence of a known source of infected meat (garbage containing meat scraps or dead animals), the rat population maintained the infection, probably through cannibalism. Population reduction was an effective method for reducing the prevalence of infection within the rat population. Therefore, to reduce the likelihood of transmission of T. spiralis between rats and swine, it is essential that rat populations in a farmyard environment be controlled.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
360
    360
  • Thumbnail: Page 
361
    361
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364