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Spatial and Temporal Dispersion of Immature Ixodes dammini on Peromyscus leucopus in Northwestern Illinois

Uriel Kitron, Carl J. Jones and John K. Bouseman
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 77, No. 6 (Dec., 1991), pp. 945-949
DOI: 10.2307/3282747
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3282747
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Spatial and Temporal Dispersion of Immature Ixodes dammini on Peromyscus leucopus in Northwestern Illinois
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Abstract

Infestation by immature Ixodes dammini and infection by Borrelia burgdorferi of the white-footed mouse Peromyscus leucopus were studied in Castle Rock State Park in northwestern Illinois during June-October 1990. Prevalence and intensity of infestation of larvae on mice were highest in August with a smaller peak in early June. The distribution of larvae on mice was highly aggregated during each of the sampling periods. Aggregation appears to be the result of a series of nonrandom successful attachments by single larvae, rather than of simultaneous attachment by clumps of larvae. Infection rate of mice by B. burgdorferi averaged 21.4% with a peak of 28.6% in August. A comparison of the numbers of attached immature ticks collected from mice and of questing ticks collected through dragging indicated that the larvae-to-nymph ratio was higher on mice than on drags. Given the low total numbers of nymphs collected from mice, this suggests a potential role for other hosts of I. dammini nymphs in northwestern Illinois.

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