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Kinetics of Liver Trapping of Infective Larvae in Murine Toxocariasis

J. C. Parsons and R. B. Grieve
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 76, No. 4 (Aug., 1990), pp. 529-536
DOI: 10.2307/3282834
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3282834
Page Count: 8
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Kinetics of Liver Trapping of Infective Larvae in Murine Toxocariasis
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Abstract

Mice sensitized by prior infection with Toxocara canis eggs trap many larvae of a challenge infection within the liver. In this study the distribution of challenge larvae in sensitized mice was examined to determine the earliest onset of liver trapping and to establish if the previously described phenomenon truly represented larval trapping. In all experiments, C57BL/6J mice were infected with a sensitization dose of 125 infective T. canis eggs on day 0 postinfection (PI) and challenged with 500 infective eggs on day 28 PI. In the initial experiments, larval numbers were determined within the intestinal contents, intestinal wall, mesenteric tissues, liver, lungs, skeletal muscle, and brain of each mouse on days 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 postchallenge (PC). Migration patterns were similar among the test and control groups except the peak of larval numbers in the liver, seen at 1 day PC in control mice, was delayed until 3 days PC in the test group. Larval trapping occurred within the liver of test mice at least by day 5 PC. In subsequent experiments, larval numbers were determined within the liver, skeletal muscle, brain of each mouse, and within the eyes of each mouse group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 wk PC. Larval numbers within the liver of test mice were similar both at 5 days PC and 16 wk PC, implying that larvae were trapped in this organ rather than delayed in their migration to other body sites. Liver trapping did not protect the eyes or brain of sensitized mice from larval migration, nor did it result in larval killing.

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