Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

In vitro Cultivation of Cells from Larval Schistosoma mansoni

Christopher J. Bayne, Jane S. Menino, Deborah J. Hobbs and David W. Barnes
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 80, No. 1 (Feb., 1994), pp. 29-35
DOI: 10.2307/3283341
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3283341
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
In vitro Cultivation of Cells from Larval Schistosoma mansoni
Preview not available

Abstract

With the intent of providing a useful tool for studies on the cellular and molecular biology of Schistosoma mansoni, we have attempted to establish indefinitely proliferating cell lines. Primary (mother) sporocysts have served as sources of tissue fragments for initiation of primary cultures in complex media containing fetal bovine serum. Viability is maintained for several months, during which time there is differential survival of individual cell types. Cells that ultrastructurally resemble germinal cells are among the most persistent. Contractile responsiveness to serotonin and flagellar movement of flame cells are sustained for several weeks. Exposure to epidermal growth factor failed to induce tyrosine phosphorylation as detectable by western blot analysis. Incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine into nucleic acid has been used as an indicator of the merit of experimental variables tested for their growth-promoting potential. Continuous proliferation remains an elusive goal, but coculture with host snail ganglia has yielded promising results. These primary cultures can be used to obtain useful information on parasite physiology. In light of our results, and of the varied lines of investigation that would be facilitated by such tools, further efforts to immortalize cell lines are warranted.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35