Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Influence of Season and Habitat on Ixodes scapularis Infestation on White-Footed Mice in Northwestern Illinois

Alessandro Mannelli, Uriel Kitron, Carl J. Jones and Timothy L. Slajchert
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 80, No. 6 (Dec., 1994), pp. 1038-1042
DOI: 10.2307/3283457
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3283457
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Influence of Season and Habitat on Ixodes scapularis Infestation on White-Footed Mice in Northwestern Illinois
Preview not available

Abstract

The effects of season and habitat on the infestation of the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) by immature Ixodes scapularis were studied at Castle Rock State Park, northwestern Illinois, during June-October 1991. Relative density of larvae on mice was higher in mid-late summer (13.7 ticks per mouse) than during the rest of the study period, whereas prevalence of nymphal infestation was highest in early summer (33.3%). Relative density of I. scapularis larvae and prevalence of nymphs on mice did not differ significantly among bottomland forest, field-forest ecotone, and upland forest habitats. In bottomland forest, total number of ticks collected from mice (472 larvae and 13 nymphs) and P. leucopus population density (6.6 mice per 0.36 ha) were higher than in the other habitats. Temporal patterns of numbers of larvae collected from mice and through dragging in bottomland forest were significantly correlated.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1038
    1038
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1039
    1039
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1040
    1040
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1041
    1041
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1042
    1042