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The Effect of Multiple Host Contacts on the Infectivity of Dengue-2 Virus-Infected Aedes aegypti

John L. Putnam and Thomas W. Scott
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 81, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 170-174
DOI: 10.2307/3283915
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3283915
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effect of Multiple Host Contacts on the Infectivity of Dengue-2 Virus-Infected Aedes aegypti
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Abstract

This study was designed to determine if transmission rates for dengue-2 virus by Aedes aegypti are altered by mosquitos probing a host for blood or imbibing blood prior to attempting transmission. Aedes aegypti is known to contact multiple hosts during each egg-laying cycle and multiple host contacts might diminish the amount of virus in infected mosquito's salivary glands or ducts and render them functionally uninfective. Probing a host 5, 10, or 20 consecutive times did not significantly alter the infectivity of parenterally infected mosquitoes. However, orally infected Ae. aegypti that probed 20 times transmitted dengue viruses at a significantly higher rate than controls. Infectivity of orally infected Ae. aegypti was unaffected by blood feeding. Our data suggest that (1) dengue virus-infected Ae. aegypti remain infective regardless of their probing or engorging history, and (2) once Ae. aegypti become infective they are extremely efficient disseminators of dengue virus.

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