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Worm Development in Hamsters Infected with Unisex and Cross-Mated Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium

Sami B. Khalil and Noshy S. Mansour
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 81, No. 1 (Feb., 1995), pp. 8-11
DOI: 10.2307/3283998
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3283998
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Worm Development in Hamsters Infected with Unisex and Cross-Mated Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium
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Abstract

Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium coexist in Egypt and in other areas in Africa, and people frequently are infected with parasites of both species. The effects of the interactions between worms of both sexes of the 2 species on development and egg laying were evaluated in vivo by infecting hamsters with cercariae from Biomphalaria alexandrina and Bulinus truncatus snails infected with single miracidia. In hamsters with unisex infections, male worms of both species were small. Schistosoma mansoni females were stunted and partially mature but did not contain eggs. Schistosoma haematobium females, though stunted, sometimes contained and laid small eggs, which were deposited in the liver, but few of which contained motile embryos. This suggests that unisexual infection with S. haematobium female worms produces a risk for liver damage due to egg deposition in tissues. Both S. mansoni and S. haematobium females that mated with males of the heterologous species were significantly larger than females from unisexual infections; they were sexually mature and possessed eggs in the uterus. The eggs in the liver homogenates of cross-specific infected hamsters contained fully developed miracidia that hatched in filtered pond water.

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