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Viability of Infective Larvae of Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, and Trichostrongylus colubriformis Following Exsheathment by Various Techniques

G. A. Conder and S. S. Johnson
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 82, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), pp. 100-102
DOI: 10.2307/3284123
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3284123
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Viability of Infective Larvae of Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, and Trichostrongylus colubriformis Following Exsheathment by Various Techniques
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Abstract

Various techniques were examined to determine optimum conditions for exsheathing infective larvae of 3 important ruminant parasites (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, and Trichostrongylus colubriformis). In repeated experiments, aliquots of 105-106 infective larvae, 1-2 mo old, of each parasite were incubated in each of 4 exsheathing media (distilled water, Earle's balanced salt solution + carbon dioxide, nematode washing buffer + carbon dioxide, or sodium hypochlorite) for 1 or 18 hr. In each case, the percentage of larvae exsheathed and infectivity for jirds was determined. Results of these studies indicate that no single exsheathing technique of those studied is optimum for every parasite. In addition, caution must be used in drawing conclusions from in vitro studies using exsheathed larvae because techniques that routinely provide high percentages of exsheathment also appear to reduce viability.

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