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Ancylostoma duodenale Is Responsible for Hookworm Infections among Pregnant Women in the Rural Plains of Nepal

R. C. Navitsky, M. L. Dreyfuss, J. Shrestha, S. K. Khatry, R. J. Stoltzfus and Albonico
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 84, No. 3 (Jun., 1998), pp. 647-651
DOI: 10.2307/3284746
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3284746
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ancylostoma duodenale Is Responsible for Hookworm Infections among Pregnant Women in the Rural Plains of Nepal
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Abstract

Fecal specimens from 292 pregnant women (ages 15-40 yr) and 129 infants (ages 10-20 wk) were examined for helminth eggs by the Kato-Katz method and cultured for helminth larvae identification using a modified Harada-Mori method. These specimens were collected from June 1995 through July 1996 in Sarlahi District in the southern rural plains of Nepal. Among pregnant women, the prevalence of helminth infection by the Kato-Katz method was 78.8%, 56.2%, and 7.9% for hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Trichuris trichiura, respectively. Using the modified Harada-Mori method, 66.1% and 2.0% of women's fecal cultures were positive for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis, respectively. All of the cultured hookworm larvae were identified as Ancylostoma duodenale. Among infants, 1 specimen was positive for hookworm and 1 for A. lumbricoides using the Kato-Katz method. The modified Harada-Mori method detected no larvae in specimens from infants. There was 81.8% agreement between the 2 methods for the detection of hookworm infection. Ancylostoma duodenale is endemic in this study population and highly prevalent in pregnant women.

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