Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Capillaria hepatica (Nematoda) Infections in Human-Habituated Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) of the Parc National de Volcans, Rwanda

Thaddeus K. Graczyk, Linda J. Lowenstine and Michael R. Cranfield
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 85, No. 6 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1168-1170
DOI: 10.2307/3285682
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3285682
Page Count: 3
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Capillaria hepatica (Nematoda) Infections in Human-Habituated Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) of the Parc National de Volcans, Rwanda
Preview not available

Abstract

Habituation to humans of free-ranging populations of endangered mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) raised concern of anthropozoonotic transmission of parasitic helminths and protozoans. Examinations of liver tissue of 19 gorillas found dead in the Parc National de Volcans, Rwanda, revealed 10 cases of hepatic nematodiasis due to Capillaria hepatica. Identifiable C. hepatica eggs were present in the liver of 4 gorillas (3 juveniles, 1 adult), and nematode cross- sections were found in 1 juvenile gorilla. Six other adult gorillas had areas of periportal and subcapsular fibrosis with calcified eggs. Histologically, the lesions surrounded by the areas of mild inflammatory reaction were characterized by subcapsular, periportal foci of fibrosis in which were embedded numerous C. hepatica eggs. Control of hepatic capillariasis in the remaining populations of mountain gorillas should be focused on eradication or control of populations of rodent pests (i.e., mice and rats) that sustain the reservoir of C. hepatica in habitats shared by gorillas and humans.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1168
    1168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1169
    1169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1170
    1170