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Strongyloides ratti: Migration Study of Third-Stage Larvae in Rats by Whole-Body Autoradiography after 35S-Methionine Labeling

Masataka Koga, An Ning and Isao Tada
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 85, No. 3 (Jun., 1999), pp. 405-409
DOI: 10.2307/3285770
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3285770
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Strongyloides ratti: Migration Study of Third-Stage Larvae in Rats by Whole-Body Autoradiography after 35S-Methionine Labeling
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Abstract

In order to clarify the migration pathway of Strongyloides ratti, Wistar rats were given 5,000 35S-labeled infective larvae subcutaneously and killed at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, and 50 hr postinfection. Prior to inoculation, the specific radioactivity level was assessed in the labeled larvae using a scintillation counter. The frozen rat specimens were sectioned at 50 μm, and the sections were freeze-dried and mounted on X-ray film in darkness. The labeled larvae appeared as dark spots on the film after 14 days of exposure. The infected larvae remained at the inoculated site (lower abdomen) until 10 hr after infection. Some larvae were found in the head portion, whereas others existed sporadically in the skin, liver, and lungs at 15 hr. After 20 and 25 hr, the majority of larvae had accumulated in the head portion. Many larvae appeared in the cranial and nasal cavities; however, no larvae were found in any other organs or tissues. At 30 hr, most larvae had begun to accumulate in the ethmoid region again. At 40 and 50 hr, some larvae were recognized in the ethmoid region, and most had already reached the small intestine. This suggests that the larvae directly move to the nasofrontal portion through the subcutis, rather than migrating to the head through either the viscera, ascending vessels, or the foramen occipital magnum.

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