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Structure and Chromosomal Localization of the Functional Intronless Human JUN Protooncogene

Kazue Hattori, Peter Angel, Michelle M. Le Beau and Michael Karin
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 85, No. 23 (Dec. 1, 1988), pp. 9148-9152
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/32905
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Structure and Chromosomal Localization of the Functional Intronless Human JUN Protooncogene
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Abstract

The JUN protooncogene encodes a protein that is functionally and biochemically identical to the transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1). To understand the structure and regulation of this important gene, a genomic clone of human JUN was isolated and its primary structure and transcription pattern were determined. Most surprisingly, the sequence of the genomic clone was found to be contiguous with the sequence of the JUN cDNA, suggesting that it lacks introns. RNase protection experiments confirm that JUN is an intronless gene that yields several transcripts due to 5 and 3 heterogeneities. Transfection experiments show that the cloned gene is functional, as it encodes a trans-acting factor that stimulates transcription of AP-1-dependent reporter gene. In situ hybridization was used to map JUN to chromosomal region 1p31-32. Interestingly, this region is frequently deleted in neuroblastomas, suggesting that elimination of AP-1 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease.

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