Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Phylogeny and Geography of Schefflera: Pervasive Polyphyly in the Largest Genus of Araliaceae

Gregory M. Plunkett, Porter P. Lowry II, David G. Frodin and Jun Wen
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Vol. 92, No. 2 (Jul., 2005), pp. 202-224
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3298514
Page Count: 23
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Phylogeny and Geography of Schefflera: Pervasive Polyphyly in the Largest Genus of Araliaceae
Preview not available

Abstract

The angiosperm family Araliaceae presently comprises roughly 1600 species, over half of which are referable to a single genus, Schefflera, whose circumscription has been broadened substantially over the past three decades. Following up on several previous analyses suggesting that Schefflera may be non-monophyletic, the present study employs an expanded sample of species from this genus, representing much more of the geographic and taxonomic breadth of Schefflera in its current circumscription. Results of phylogenetic analyses based on nuclear (ITS) and plastid (trnL-trnF) DNA sequences indicate that Schefflera is markedly polyphyletic, comprising no fewer than five major clades distributed across the phylogenetic tree of Araliaceae. However, despite its overall polyphyly, the reinstatement of most formerly recognized segregate genera would not yield monophyletic groups. By contrast, comparisons of the molecular cladograms to an informal classification system based on morphology indicate that all but one of its infrageneric groupings are monophyletic. The five clades of Schefflera recognized here also correspond perfectly to geographic distributions: two morphologically distinct clades are centered in the southwest Pacific, and three other clades are centered in the Neotropics, Asia/Malesia, and Africa/Madagascar.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[202]
    [202]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224