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Phylogeny, Radiation, and Transoceanic Dispersal of New Zealand Alpine Buttercups: Molecular Evidence under Split Decomposition

Peter J. Lockhart, Patricia A. McLenachan, David Havell, David Glenny, Daniel Huson and Uwe Jensen
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Vol. 88, No. 3 (Summer, 2001), pp. 458-477
DOI: 10.2307/3298586
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3298586
Page Count: 20
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Phylogeny, Radiation, and Transoceanic Dispersal of New Zealand Alpine Buttercups: Molecular Evidence under Split Decomposition
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Abstract

The "Alpine Ranunculi of New Zealand" are a monophyletic group of species distributed between the New Zealand alps, Australian alps, and the subantarctic Campbell and Auckland Islands. For this group we determined and analyzed sequences for the nuclear ITS and chloroplast JSA regions. This latter region was identified from an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) gel as being potentially phylogenetically informative. We have used quartet puzzling to represent the overall phylogenetic structure of these sequence data and split decomposition to investigate more closely the phylogenetic information among sequences from two lineages within the alpine radiation. We describe molecular evidence that shows that diversification of alpine Ranunculi has accompanied the onset of Pliocene mountain building in New Zealand, and that during range expansion of species, regional speciation into novel alpine habitats has occurred with parallel evolution of morphologies between more distantly related species. Our analyses also show that, during diversification and range expansion, the New Zealand alps acted as a center for long-distance dispersal to Australia and the New Zealand subantarctic islands.

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