Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Copyright: When Is Monopoly Efficient?

Michael O'Hare
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Vol. 4, No. 3 (Spring, 1985), pp. 407-418
DOI: 10.2307/3324194
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3324194
Page Count: 12
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Copyright: When Is Monopoly Efficient?
Preview not available

Abstract

Many goods and services are thought to be most efficiently provided under monopoly or oligopoly conditions. For instance, copyright is generally deemed of great value to authors, artists, and the public, an essential element to an efficient market in intellectual and artistic creation. Yet, evidence suggests this esteem may not be entirely justified. Copyright for a particular medium is valuable to the author or to society only when certain economic and technological conditions obtain--such as a market for subsidiary uses, a high fixed cost of copying, and a market for copies.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[407]
    [407]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
408
    408
  • Thumbnail: Page 
409
    409
  • Thumbnail: Page 
410
    410
  • Thumbnail: Page 
411
    411
  • Thumbnail: Page 
412
    412
  • Thumbnail: Page 
413
    413
  • Thumbnail: Page 
414
    414
  • Thumbnail: Page 
415
    415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418