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Federalism and Competing Values in the Reagan Administration

Timothy J. Conlan
Publius
Vol. 16, No. 1, Assessing the New Federalism (Winter, 1986), pp. 29-47
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3330175
Page Count: 19
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Federalism and Competing Values in the Reagan Administration
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Abstract

Ronald Reagan has made revitalizing federalism a central component of his domestic agenda. Although this goal has sometimes complemented his other policy aims, this article focuses on cases where conflicts have arisen between the president's devolutionary goals and other primary objectives of his administration, such as deregulating the private sector and reducing domestic expenditures. Judged from this perspective, policies supportive of federalism, as defined by the president, have fared less well in his administration. After a series of brief case studies analyzing such policy decisions, the implications for the future of federalism are discussed.

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