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The State, Collective Bargaining and the Shape of Strikes in Canada

Christopher Huxley
The Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie
Vol. 4, No. 3 (Summer, 1979), pp. 223-239
DOI: 10.2307/3340328
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3340328
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The State, Collective Bargaining and the Shape of Strikes in Canada
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Abstract

This paper examines the role of the state in order to explain the distinctive pattern of Canadian strike activity, particularly the long duration of stoppages. Two interrelated aspects of state intervention in collective bargaining are considered: direct regulation involving restrictions on use of the strike; and enactments designed to legitimate the role of the state. Both types of policy are shown to have influenced the shape of strikes. It is suggested that Canadian employers may have preferred more protracted strikes to more frequent, but less predictable stoppages. Certain countertrends to this institutionalization of industrial conflict, and the likely form of further state response, are discussed. /// Cet article examine le rôle de l'état pour expliquer le style distinctif des grèves au Canada, en particulier des arrêts de travail de longue dureé. On y considère deux aspects liés d'un à l'autre de l'intervention de l'état dans les negociations collectives: la règlementation directe impliquant des restrictions sur l'usage de la grève; et des décrets conçus pour légitimer le rôle de l'état. On montre que les deux politiques ont influencé la structure des grèves. On y indique que les employeurs Canadiens ont peut-être préferé les grèves prolongées aux arrêts de travail plus fréquents mais moins prévisibles. On parle des tendances contre cette institutionalisation des conflits industriels, ainsi que des formes nouvelles des réactions de l'état.

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