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Ethnic and Gender Distribution of Sociologists and Anthropologists, 1971-96: Canada

M. R. Nakhaie
The Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie
Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring, 2001), pp. 215-232
DOI: 10.2307/3341679
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3341679
Page Count: 18
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Ethnic and Gender Distribution of Sociologists and Anthropologists, 1971-96: Canada
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Abstract

This paper evaluates the distribution of males and females of British, French and "other" ethnic origins among sociology and anthropology professors from 1971 to 1996. The results suggest that there has been a steady increase in the proportion of females compared to males, however, most of the increase has been experienced by women of British and French origins. The British and French females increased their representation both in terms of first time employment into the rank of assistant professor and with respect to promotion to higher ranks. In contrast, females of "other" ethnic origins were less likely to move into the university setting, but, once there, they were more likely to move up into higher ranks. In general, the study suggests that we should not view the category of "woman" as monolithic: British women are more privileged than French and "non-charter" women and men in the academy. /// Cet article évalue la distribution des hommes et des femmes d'origine ethnique britannique, française et celles qui appartiennent à "d'autres ethnies" parmi les professeurs de sociologie et d'anthropologie de 1971 à 1996. Les résultats suggèrent qu'il y a eu une augmentation constante dans la proportion des femmes comparées aux hommes mais la plus grande augmentation a eu lieu parmi les femmes d'origine britannique et française. Les femmes britanniques et françaises ont augmenté leur participation à la fois en termes d'un premier emploi au rang de professeur adjoint et dans le cas de promotions aux rangs supérieurs. Par contre, il est moins probable que des femmes d'origine ethnique "autre" trouvent des postes universitaires mais, une fois qu'elles les obtiennent, il est plus probable qu'elles passent à un rang supérieur plus rapidement. En général, notre étude indique que nous ne devrions pas interpréter la catégorie de "femme" comme étant monolithique: en ce qui concerne les carrières universitaires les femmes britanniques sont plus privilégiées que les femmes françaises et que les femmes et les hommes désignés comme des "non-membres de la Charte."

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