If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Sociology for Whom? The Role of Sociology in Reflexive Modernity

Anne Mesny
The Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie
Vol. 23, No. 2/3 (Spring - Summer, 1998), pp. 159-178
DOI: 10.2307/3341962
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3341962
Page Count: 20
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Sociology for Whom? The Role of Sociology in Reflexive Modernity
Preview not available

Abstract

Sociologists tend to have a short-sighted conception of the use and usefulness of sociological knowledge. Policy-makers are not the foremost "users" of sociology. In conditions of "reflexive modernity," sociological knowledge is routinely appropriated by "lay people" in the context of their day-to-day activities. Sociologists can contribute to the diffusion of a "sociological consciousness" and to its incorporation into common sense. In a period of "reflexive modernity," people's sense of self-identity is marked by a lay sociological consciousness, which infuses the routine construction of their self-narratives. This lay "sociological consciousness" pertains to the way people relate their individual and personal experience to the social sphere. It refers to their sense of control and responsibility regarding what happens to them and to others. /// Les connaissances sociologiques ne sont pas seulement utilisées par les politiciens et autres experts. Les "gens ordinaires" s'approprient les savoirs issus des sciences sociales de manière routinière, c'est-à-dire dans le cadre des décisions de la vie quotidienne. La thèse de la "modernité réflexive" permet de situer le processus d'appropriation des connaissances sociologiques par les gens ordinaires dans le cadre des transformations qui ont trait à la construction de l'identité-de-soi. Une forme d'utilité majeure de la sociologie réside dans la transformation continue du sens commun, et dans la diffusion d'une "conscience sociologique," qui marque la façon dont les gens construisent leurs "narrartifs-de-vie." Cette conscience sociologique renvoie à la relation entre le "personnel" et le "social," et à la façon dont les gens déterminent leur responsibilité et leur degré de contrôle vis-à-vis des événements de la vie quotidienne.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172
  • Thumbnail: Page 
173
    173
  • Thumbnail: Page 
174
    174
  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178