Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Burdens of Race and History on Black Americans' Attitudes toward Needle Exchange Policy to Prevent HIV Disease

Stephen B. Thomas and Sandra Crouse Quinn
Journal of Public Health Policy
Vol. 14, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 320-347
DOI: 10.2307/3343042
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3343042
Page Count: 28
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Burdens of Race and History on Black Americans' Attitudes toward Needle Exchange Policy to Prevent HIV Disease
Preview not available

Abstract

We must enter the second decade of AIDS with the knowledge that existing public health efforts have failed to stop the disproportionate spread of HIV disease among Americans of African descent. This article presents the cold epidemiological facts which lay bare the moral tragedy that Black Americans are being killed by a disease which is almost totally preventable. This paper discusses the primary behavioral risk factors for HIV infection and the context in which HIV disease emerged in the 1980s. Additionally, we present results from cross-sectional surveys of selected black populations to demonstrate how AIDS knowledge deficits and attitudinal barriers have shaped the perceptions of Black Americans toward needle exchange programs as an HIV prevention strategy advocated by public health authorities. A model that may be utilized to educate the Black community and facilitate their involvement in the development of needle exchange policy is described.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320
  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326
  • Thumbnail: Page 
327
    327
  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332
  • Thumbnail: Page 
333
    333
  • Thumbnail: Page 
334
    334
  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342
  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346
  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347