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Applied Music Teaching Behavior as a Function of Selected Personality Variables

Charles P. Schmidt
Journal of Research in Music Education
Vol. 37, No. 4 (Winter, 1989), pp. 258-271
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3344660
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Applied Music Teaching Behavior as a Function of Selected Personality Variables
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships among applied music teaching behaviors and personality variables measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Subjects (N = 43) were college-level applied music instructors in the areas of woodwinds, brass, strings, voice, and keyboard. The following teacher behaviors were examined as dependent variables: (a) approvals, (b) disapprovals, (c) reinforcement rate, (d) teacher talk, (e) teacher models, (f) teacher questions, and (g) pace. Multivariate tests of significance indicated that the main effects of extraversion/introversion (EI) and sensing/intuition (SN) were statistically significant, while thinking/feeling (TF) and judging/perceiving (JP) were nonsignificant. EI × JP was the sole significant two-way interaction effect. Univariate F tests indicated significant differences between (a) E and I subgroups on reinforcement rate and approvals and (b) S and N subgroups on rate of reinforcement, approvals, teacher models, and pace. A significant EI × JP interaction effect was found for rate of reinforcement, approvals, and pace.

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