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Performance Expectancy, Success, Satisfaction, and Attributions as Variables in Band Challenges

Theodore A. Chandler, David Chiarella and Carl Auria
Journal of Research in Music Education
Vol. 35, No. 4 (Winter, 1987), pp. 249-258
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3345077
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Performance Expectancy, Success, Satisfaction, and Attributions as Variables in Band Challenges
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Abstract

Motivation of band members was tested by asking them if they had ever challenged for chair positions and how frequently, if they felt they were correctly placed, what their expected performance level was for 3 months later, what degree of satisfaction and feeling of success they experienced with their current level of performance, and how much they enjoyed playing their instruments. Degree of satisfaction with one's instrument and the factors to which one attributes one's current level of performance were also assessed. Three comparable-sized bands (total N = 234) representing urban, suburban, and rural areas completed a questionnaire anonymously. Results supported the hypothesis that if one perceives success and satisfaction with one's current level of performance, one will challenge more and probably attribute that success to internal factors such as effort, natural musical ability, and technical knowledge of the instruments. Failure and lack of satisfaction with one's current level of performance resulted in fewer challenges and external attributions.

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