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The Effect of Differentially Focused Observation on Evaluation of Instruction

Robert A. Duke and Carol A. Prickett
Journal of Research in Music Education
Vol. 35, No. 1 (Spring, 1987), pp. 27-37
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3345166
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effect of Differentially Focused Observation on Evaluation of Instruction
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Abstract

The present study examined evaluations by observers directed to attend to specific aspects of one-to-one instruction in applied music. One hundred forty-three nonmusic education majors enrolled in music study observed one of three videotaped versions of an 11-minute private lesson in violin. Visual presentation and observation instructions focused subjects' attention toward 1) the student, 2) the teacher, or 3) both student and teacher. Subjects evaluated 10 aspects of the lesson and estimated the frequency of approval and disapproval feedback. There were significant differences (p < .05) in the evaluations of teacher attitude and student attitude among the three presentation conditions, with subjects rating less positively the individual to whom attention was directed. Group mean estimations of disapproval frequency were also significantly different (p < .002), with subjects who were directed to observe teacher behavior estimating a greater number of teacher disapproval responses. In addition, analyses of subjects' written observations indicated considerable within-group variability concerning the perception of events. This information seems important in relation to the structuring of observation experiences for preservice teachers.

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