Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The "Missing Males" and Other Gender Issues in Music Education: Evidence from the "Music Supervisors' Journal," 1914-1924

Julia Eklund Koza
Journal of Research in Music Education
Vol. 41, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 212-232
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3345326
Page Count: 21
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The "Missing Males" and Other Gender Issues in Music Education: Evidence from the "Music Supervisors' Journal," 1914-1924
Preview not available

Abstract

An analysis of gender-related references appearing in the "Music Supervisors' Journal" (MSJ) from 1914 through 1924 revealed that both coeducational and single-sex musical organizations abounded and that vocal and instrumental instruction for boys and girls was advocated. When one sex or the other was singled out for consideration, however, the spotlight usually was focused on males. In addition to the "missing males" problem, writers in the MSJ discussed the role of music in the education of boys, career opportunities in music for males, the relationship of music to the nature and character development of boys, boys' musical likes and dislikes, the male singing voice, and music for the man at war. By contrast, little attention was devoted exclusively to females, their interests, or their problems. This analysis invites reflection on whether gender issues pertaining to females continue to be overlooked by the music education profession today.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232