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Journal Article

Listeners' Preference for Music of Other Cultures: Comparing Response Modes

Ruth V. Brittin
Journal of Research in Music Education
Vol. 44, No. 4 (Winter, 1996), pp. 328-340
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3345445
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Listeners' Preference for Music of Other Cultures: Comparing Response Modes
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Abstract

This study was designed to investigate listeners' preferences for music of other cultures, as determined by 10-point Likert-type scales and by continuous ratings taken throughout the duration of each excerpt with a Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI). Music major (n = 75), nonmusic major (n = 75), and junior high school (n = 75) musicians participated. One-third of each group's subjects rated the selections with a Likert-type rating scale, representing a summative, static response. One-third of each group used a single CRDI dial to continuously show preference throughout the music. The remaining third continuously manipulated two CRDI dials, one to indicate preference and the other complexity. Selections representing the following cultures were included: the Caribbean, Africa, India, and Oceania. Listeners using the continuous measurement responses rated selections significantly higher than did listeners using paper-and-pencil rating scales (p < .05). There was no significant difference in preference between listeners who rated preference only and listeners who rated preference and complexity. There were no significant differences attributable to level of music experience. These results have implications for (1) the way teachers present new material to students, (2) the manner in which teachers structure student feedback, and (3) the technological devices teachers use for music activities.

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