Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Differences in Preference for Subtle Dynamic Nuance between Conductors, Middle School Music Students, and Elementary School Students

Vernon Burnsed
Journal of Research in Music Education
Vol. 49, No. 1 (Spring, 2001), pp. 49-56
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3345809
Page Count: 8
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Differences in Preference for Subtle Dynamic Nuance between Conductors, Middle School Music Students, and Elementary School Students
Preview not available

Abstract

This study began as a systematic replication of two previous studies in which a significant proportion of elementary and middle school music students preferred versions of American folk songs with explicit variation in dynamics over versions of the same folk songs where the dynamics were held constant. In the present study, the preference test used in the previous studies was modified to reflect a more realistic representation of dynamic nuance. Dynamic variation was reduced by one-third, and smoother curvatures were applied to the crescendos and decrescendos of the expressive versions of the 10 folk songs. This revised test was administered to 288 Grade 1-5 students, 78 middle school music students, and 22 conductors. The results of the study indicate that age and/or musical experience may affect perception and preference for subtle dynamic nuance in music.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56