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The Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carries a Secretable Arachidonate 15-Lipoxygenase

Russell E. Vance, Song Hong, Karsten Gronert, Charles N. Serhan and John J. Mekalanos
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 101, No. 7 (Feb. 17, 2004), pp. 2135-2139
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3371407
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Carries a Secretable Arachidonate 15-Lipoxygenase
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Abstract

In mammals, lipoxygenases play key roles in inflammation by initiating the transformation of arachidonic acid into potent bioactive lipid mediators such as leukotrienes and lipoxins. In general, most bacteria are believed to lack lipoxygenases and their polyunsaturated fatty acid substrates. It is therefore of interest that an ORF (PA1169) with high homology to eukaryotic lipoxygenases was discovered by analysis of the whole-genome sequence of the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using TLC and liquid chromatography-UV-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-UV-MS-MS), we demonstrate that PA1169 encodes a bacterial lipoxygenase (LoxA) that converts arachidonic acid into 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). Although mammalian lipoxygenases are cytoplasmic enzymes, P. aeruginosa LoxA activity is secreted. Taken together, these results suggest a mechanism by which a pathogen-secreted lipoxygenase may modulate host defense and inflammation via alteration of the biosynthesis of local chemical mediators.

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