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Identification of Mushroom Body Miniature, a Zinc-Finger Protein Implicated in Brain Development of Drosophila

Thomas Raabe, Susanne Clemens-Richter, Thomas Twardzik, Anselm Ebert, Gertrud Gramlich, Martin Heisenberg and Howard A. Nash
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 101, No. 39 (Sep. 28, 2004), pp. 14276-14281
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3373479
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Identification of Mushroom Body Miniature, a Zinc-Finger Protein Implicated in Brain Development of Drosophila
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Abstract

The mushroom bodies are bilaterally arranged structures in the protocerebrum of Drosophila and most other insect species. Mutants with altered mushroom body structure have been instrumental not only in establishing their role in distinct behavioral functions but also in identifying the molecular pathways that control mushroom body development. The mushroom body miniature1 (mbm1) mutation results in grossly reduced mushroom bodies and odor learning deficits in females. With a survey of genomic rescue constructs, we have pinpointed mbm1 to a single transcription unit and identified a single nucleotide exchange in the 5′ untranslated region of the corresponding transcript resulting in a reduced expression of the protein. The most obvious feature of the Mbm protein is a pair of C2 HC zinc fingers, implicating a function of the protein in binding nucleic acids. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that expression of the Mbm protein is not restricted to the mushroom bodies. BrdUrd labeling experiments indicate a function of Mbm in neuronal precursor cell proliferation.

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