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Can We Expect Productivity Improvement in the Federal Government?

Brian L. Usilaner
Public Productivity Review
Vol. 5, No. 3 (Sep., 1981), pp. 237-246
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
DOI: 10.2307/3380289
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3380289
Page Count: 10
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Can We Expect Productivity Improvement in the Federal Government?
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Abstract

Federal efforts in productivity improvement have not been satisfactory. Few incentives and many disincentives inhibit federal managers from making real progress. Among these are structural barriers such as the budget process, personnel system, arbitrary resource controls, and organizational configurations. Environmental barriers also stand in the way of productivity improvement. These include low morale and pay structure as well as the lack of administrative capability and an unwillingness to place importance on productivity. The author examines these barriers and offers some suggestions to remedy the situation.

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