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Conceptions of Community Health Nurses regarding Low-Income Black, Mexican American, and White Families: Part 2

Elizabeth A. Erkel
Journal of Community Health Nursing
Vol. 2, No. 2 (1985), pp. 109-118
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3427557
Page Count: 10
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Conceptions of Community Health Nurses regarding Low-Income Black, Mexican American, and White Families: Part 2
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Abstract

Using a descriptive survey design, an investigation of the accuracy of community health nurses' conceptions of low-income black, Mexican American, and white family life-styles and health care patterns was conducted. It was hypothesized that there would be a difference in the health care delivery problems among low-income, ethnic-minority families identified by community health nurses. The data were collected by mail questionnaire from 224 randomly selected subjects. The respondents neither agreed nor disagreed with stereotypes of low-income black, Mexican American, and white families - they were indecisive. The participants did not identify significantly different problems in delivering nursing care to the three ethnic classes (p > .05). The findings suggest that community health nurses in the sampled population have inadequate knowledge of ethnic-class family life-styles, which could contribute to patient noncompliance with health care plans.

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