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Statistics and Biomedical Research

Robert W. Miller
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 32 (Oct., 1979), pp. 17-18
DOI: 10.2307/3428998
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3428998
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

Medical observations of leukemia or Hodgkin's disease clusters in time and space have led statisticians to invent techniques to evaluate the probability that these occurrences were due to chance. A difficult computation in human genetics was simplified by a matrix devised by a non-genetical statistician, and readily adapted to newly emerging computer-processing. These experiences exemplify the special opportunity in Japan to enhance research by merging mathematical talent with biomedical observations.

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