Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Asthma and Respiratory Irritants (Ozone)

Frances Silverman
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 29 (Apr., 1979), pp. 131-136
DOI: 10.2307/3429055
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3429055
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Asthma and Respiratory Irritants (Ozone)
Preview not available

Abstract

Asthmatics appear to be more susceptible to the effects of air pollutants than nonasthmatics. The present studies were undertaken to examine the effects of exposing asthmatics to ozone concentrations that occur in the environment. Seventeen well-documented male and female asthmatics have been exposed for 2 hr in an environmental chamber to 0.25 ppm of ozone on one occasion (ozone) and to air on another occasion (air). Effects were assessed by measurements of pulmonary function obtained prior to (0 hr), every half-hour during and at the end of all exposures (2 hr). Paired t-test analysis of lung volumes, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec ( FEV1.0), and maximum expiratory flow rates at 50% of vital capacity (V̇50%VC) showed no significant changes (p > 0.05) when the following comparisons were made: 0 hr air vs 0 hr ozone, 0 hr air vs. 2 hr air, 0 hr ozone vs. 2 hr ozone, 2 hr air vs. 2 hr ozone. There was variability in severity of asthma and pulmonary function status; most subjects were taking some form of medication at the time of study. Some asthmatics showed no change or improvement with both air and ozone and others developed greater reductions in pulmonary function with ozone than with air. Approximately one-third of the asthmatics demonstrated greater changes in V̇50%VC with exposure to 0.25 ppm of ozone relative to air exposure. These studies indicate that acute exposures to ozone at realistic concentrations in the environment can produce adverse responses in some asthmatics.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136