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Household Surface Lead Dust: Its Accumulation in Vacant Homes

James W. Sayre and Monica D. Katzel
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 29 (Apr., 1979), pp. 179-182
DOI: 10.2307/3429061
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3429061
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Household Surface Lead Dust: Its Accumulation in Vacant Homes
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Abstract

House dust has been suspected as a source of lead in the exposure of children, particularly those whose blood lead levels are in the moderately elevated range. The means by which household surface lead accumulates is at present not clear. By towel wipe sampling, 24 vacant houses in urban Rochester and Buffalo, New York, were examined for lead content on windowsills, floors, and other surfaces. High yields of lead were obtained from windowsills and floor areas adjacent windows. When washed and resampled, these areas yielded greatly reduced lead values. It is suggested that surface lead may represent a deposit phenomenon. The entry of exterior airborne particulate lead around the loose-fitting windows of older homes appears possible.

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