Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Relationship between Metal Toxicity to Subcellular Systems and the Carcinogenic Response

K. S. Squibb and B. A. Fowler
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 40 (Aug., 1981), pp. 181-188
DOI: 10.2307/3429231
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3429231
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Relationship between Metal Toxicity to Subcellular Systems and the Carcinogenic Response
Preview not available

Abstract

The effects of metals on subcellular organelle functions have been reviewed in relation to carcinogenesis. Perturbations of the normal uptake and metabolism of carcinogens can arise through changes in microsomal enzyme activities, membrane permeabilities, and cell turnover. Metal effects on heme-dependent oxidative functions are well documented and are primarily manifested by increased heme degradation rates (microsomal heme oxygenase activity), decreased heme production (mitochondrial and cytosolic heme biosynthetic enzymes) and, in the case of a few metals, through nuclear effects of metals on the induction of microsomal enzymes. Many metals are accumulated by lysosomes, but known effects of metals on the function of these organelles in sequestering and storing organic compounds are few. Studies of changes in plasma or mitochondrial membrane permeabilities by metals have centered mainly on the susceptibility of membrane ATPase activities to metal ion alteration and on the involvement of metals in lipid peroxidation and free radical formation. Knowledge of the effects of metals on subcellular organelle functions should aid in the understanding of the mechanisms by which metal ions may play a role in the carcinogenic response.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188