Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Polybrominated Biphenyls in Model and Environmentally Contaminated Human Blood: Protein Binding and Immunotoxicological Studies

John Roboz, John Greaves and J. George Bekesi
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 60 (May, 1985), pp. 107-113
DOI: 10.2307/3429950
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3429950
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Polybrominated Biphenyls in Model and Environmentally Contaminated Human Blood: Protein Binding and Immunotoxicological Studies
Preview not available

Abstract

A review and summary is given of analytical, biochemical, and immunological studies made following an immunodiagnostic investigation which revealed significant decreases in the numbers, and changes in the functional integrity, of both T-and B-lymphocytes in a group of Michigan dairy farmers exposed to polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) which had been inadvertently introduced into the food chain in 1973. A quantification technique based on selected ion monitoring of bromine anions, obtained in negative chemical ionization, permitted determination of 10-35 pg of individual PBB congener per mL serum, a 20-fold improvement over electron capture gas chromatography. An in vitro spiked system was established and shown to be a representative model of environmentally contaminated blood. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric quantification determined that the distribution of PBB among plasma, erythrocytes, mononucleocytes and polymorphonucleocytes was 89:9:<1:<1. In plasma 80% of the PBB was bound to apolipoproteins B and A in a 3:1 ratio. No preferential absorption of PBB congeners was found in the blood compartments suggesting that changes in the relative abundances of PBB congeners observed in longitudinal studies on Michigan subjects reflect differences in excretion rates or metabolism. A repeat in 1981 of the immunodiagnostic tests conducted in 1976 revealed a virtually complete persistence of the immune dysfunctions in the Michigan farmers exposed to PBB a decade ago.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[107]
    [107]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113