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Computer-Assisted Mechanistic Structure-Activity Studies: Application to Diverse Classes of Chemical Carcinogens

Gilda H. Loew, M. Poulsen, E. Kirkjian, J. Ferrell, B. S. Sudhindra and M. Rebagliati
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 61 (Sep., 1985), pp. 69-96
DOI: 10.2307/3430063
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3430063
Page Count: 28
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Computer-Assisted Mechanistic Structure-Activity Studies: Application to Diverse Classes of Chemical Carcinogens
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Abstract

In the first part of this paper we have indicated how the techniques and capabilities of theoretical chemistry, together with experimental results, can be used in a mechanistic approach to structure-activity studies of toxicity. In the second part, we have illustrated how this computer-assisted approach has been used to identify and calculate causally related molecular indicators of relative carcinogenic activity in five classes of chemical carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methyl derivatives, aromatic amines, chloroethanes, chloroalkenes and dialkyl nitrosamines. In each class of chemicals studied, candidate molecular indicators have been identified that could be useful in predictive screening of unknown compounds. In addition, further insights into some mechanistic aspects of chemical carcinogenesis have been obtained. Finally, experiments have been suggested to both verify the usefulness of the indicators and test their mechanistic implications.

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