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Identification of Subpopulations That Are Sensitive to Ozone Exposure: Use of End Points Currently Available and Potential Use of Laboratory-Based End Points under Development

Robert B. Devlin
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 101, Supplement 4: Environmental Epidemiology (Dec., 1993), pp. 225-230
DOI: 10.2307/3431684
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3431684
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Identification of Subpopulations That Are Sensitive to Ozone Exposure: Use of End Points Currently Available and Potential Use of Laboratory-Based End Points under Development
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Abstract

A number of epidemiological studies have attempted to assess the effect of recurrent ozone exposure in humans. For the most part, they have failed to document convincingly an association between chronic ozone exposure and differences in lung function performance or respiratory symptoms. This is not surprising given the small respiratory effects observed in animals chronically exposed to ozone and assuming that people with abnormal respiratory function resulting from other occupational or environmental exposures, such as tobacco smoke, would make up a much larger percentage of the population than people with respiratory effects attributable to ozone. Therefore, either more sensitive end points must be developed to detect subtle changes due to chronic ozone exposure, or ways of selecting subpopulations that are especially sensitive to ozone must be devised. It has been well documented that there are large and reproducible differences in the acute response of individuals to ozone as measured by pulmonary function tests. Recently, it has also been shown that there are large differences in the acute response of individuals to ozone as measured by inflammatory and other biochemical parameters. This paper discusses the problems of selecting individuals who are sensitive to ozone depending on the end point chosen. It also describes potential new sensitive end points that might be available for ozone epidemiology studies in the near future.

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