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Cell Proliferation and Chemical Carcinogenesis: Symposium Overview

Ronald L. Melnick, James Huff, J. Carl Barrett, Robert R. Maronpot, George Lucier and Christopher J. Portier
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 101, Supplement 5: Cell Proliferation and Chemical Carcinogenesis (Dec., 1993), pp. 3-7
DOI: 10.2307/3431836
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3431836
Page Count: 5
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Cell Proliferation and Chemical Carcinogenesis: Symposium Overview
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Abstract

Cancer, by definition, is a proliferative disease. The fundamental scientific issue explored at the international symposium "Cell Proliferation and Chemical Carcinogenesis" was the impact of chemically enhanced cell proliferation on the dynamic carcinogenic processes. This conference, held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences January 14-16, 1992, provided an open forum for the exchange of new results, information, and ideas in four areas: a) general principles of cell division and carcinogenesis, b) critical evaluation of cell proliferation methodologies, c) cell proliferation and modeling of organ-specific carcinogenesis, and d) cell proliferation and human carcinogenesis. This overview summarizes key findings from that symposium. The general view expressed was that although cell proliferation is involved inextricably in the development of cancers, chemically enhanced cell division does not reliably predict carcinogenicity. Our knowledge of the multistep nature of carcinogenesis has advanced substantially during recent years; however, much still needs to be learned. A greater understanding of the cellular and molecular events in chemical carcinogenesis should improve all aspects of the overall risk assessment process, including extrapolations based on dose, species, and interindividual differences.

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