Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Looking for Causes of Neural Tube Defects: Where Does the Environment Fit in?

Lowell E. Sever
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 103, Supplement 6 (Sep., 1995), pp. 165-171
DOI: 10.2307/3432369
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3432369
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Looking for Causes of Neural Tube Defects: Where Does the Environment Fit in?
Preview not available

Abstract

The neural tube defects anencephaly and spina bifida are important causes of infant mortality and morbidity. Recent studies suggest that many of these defects can be prevented by the periconceptional use of folic acid. At the same time, we do not know what causes most cases of neural tube defects and there is evidence to suggest that they are etiologically heterogeneous. Additional research needs to be directed toward the role of occupational and environmental exposures in the etiology of these defects. Importantly, studies need to examine embryologically and anatomically specific types of defects and develop accurate information on biologically relevant exposures. Exposures toward which attention needs to be directed include organic solvents; agricultural chemicals, including pesticides; water nitrates; heavy metals such as mercury; ionizing radiation; and water disinfection by products. We also recommend that additional attention be paid to mechanisms of neural tube closure and to the potential role of genetic heterogeneity in the absorption and metabolism of xenobiotics and in their effects on the neural tube.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171