If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Environmental Signaling: A Biological Context for Endocrine Disruption

Ann Oliver Cheek, Peter M. Vonier, Eva Oberdörster, Bridgette Collins Burow and John A. McLachlan
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 106, Supplement 1 (Feb., 1998), pp. 5-10
DOI: 10.2307/3433910
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3433910
Page Count: 6
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Environmental Signaling: A Biological Context for Endocrine Disruption
Preview not available

Abstract

Endogenous and exogenous chemical signals have evolved as a means for organisms to respond to physical or biological stimuli in the environment. Sensitivity to these signals can make organisms vulnerable to inadvertent signals from xenobiotics. In this review we discuss how various chemicals can interact with steroidlike signaling pathways, especially estrogen. Numerous compounds have estrogenic activity, including steroids, phytoestrogens, and synthetic chemicals. We compare bioavailability, metabolism, interaction with receptors, and interaction with cell-signaling pathways among these three structurally diverse groups in order to understand how these chemicals influence physiological responses. Based on their mechanisms of action, chemical steroid mimics could plausibly be associated with recent adverse health trends in humans and animals.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10