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Effects of Oral Exposure to Mining Waste on in Vivo Dopamine Release from Rat Striatum

Verónica M. Rodríguez, Leticia Dufour, Leticia Carrizales, Fernando Díaz-Barriga and María E. Jiménez-Capdeville
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 106, No. 8 (Aug., 1998), pp. 487-491
DOI: 10.2307/3434181
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3434181
Page Count: 5
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Effects of Oral Exposure to Mining Waste on in Vivo Dopamine Release from Rat Striatum
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Abstract

Several single components of mining waste (arsenic, manganese, lead, cadmium) to which humans are exposed at the mining area of Villa de la Paz, Mexico, are known to provoke alterations of striatal dopaminergic parameters. In this study we used an animal model to examine neurochemical changes resulting from exposure to a metal mixture. We used microdialysis to compare in vivo dopamine release from adult rats subchronically exposed to a mining waste by oral route with those from a control group from a sodium arsenite group (25 mg/kg/day). We found that arsenic and manganese do accumulate in rat brain after 2 weeks of oral exposure. The mining waste group showed significantly decreased basal levels of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC; 66.7 ± 7.53 pg/μl) when compared to a control group (113.7 ± 14.3 pg/μl). Although basal dopamine release rates were comparable among groups, when the system was challenged with a long-standing depolarization through high-potassium perfusion, animals exposed to mining waste were not able to sustain an increased dopamine release in response to depolarization (mining waste group 5.5 ± 0.5 pg/μl versus control group 21.7 ± 5.8 pg/μl). Also, DOPAC and homovanillic acid levels were significantly lower in exposed animals than in controls during stimulation with high potassium. The arsenite group showed a similar tendency to that from the mining waste group. In vivo microdialysis provides relevant data about the effects of a chemical mixture. Our results indicate that this mining waste may represent a health risk for the exposed population.

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