Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Ecological Distribution of Grapsid and Ocypodid Shore Crabs (Crustacea: Brachyura) in Tasmania

D. J. G. Griffin
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 40, No. 3 (Oct., 1971), pp. 597-621
DOI: 10.2307/3440
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3440
Page Count: 25
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Ecological Distribution of Grapsid and Ocypodid Shore Crabs (Crustacea: Brachyura) in Tasmania
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) The distributions of the nine grapsid and two ocypodid species of shore crab in Tasmania are described in relation to substrate, cover, wave action, salinity and major tidal levels on the shore. The breeding and moulting cycles, the number and relative volumes of the gills and the arrangement of particular types of hairs on the mouthparts are described. Their behaviour in the laboratory, in relation to freshwater, immersion in water, substrate and cover, is considered and compared with their apparent behaviour towards these factors in nature. (2) The major factors determining the species' distributions appear to be substrate, availability and type of cover, salinity range, exposure to wave action and length of time for which particular shore zones are uncovered by water. (3) Although the distribution of each species overlaps that of others, each is most abundant in a particular type of habitat where other species do not occur in maximum abundance. Juveniles have a wider distribution than adults. (4) More species occur in the midlittoral area of stony beaches sheltered from heavy wave action than in any other habitat. (5) Each species shows a number of morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations to its characteristic habitat. Although the niches of most of the species are broad there is no evidence that interspecific competition is important in determining their limits.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
597
    597
  • Thumbnail: Page 
598
    598
  • Thumbnail: Page 
599
    599
  • Thumbnail: Page 
600
    600
  • Thumbnail: Page 
601
    601
  • Thumbnail: Page 
602
    602
  • Thumbnail: Page 
603
    603
  • Thumbnail: Page 
604
    604
  • Thumbnail: Page 
605
    605
  • Thumbnail: Page 
606
    606
  • Thumbnail: Page 
607
    607
  • Thumbnail: Page 
608
    608
  • Thumbnail: Page 
609
    609
  • Thumbnail: Page 
610
    610
  • Thumbnail: Page 
611
    611
  • Thumbnail: Page 
612
    612
  • Thumbnail: Page 
613
    613
  • Thumbnail: Page 
614
    614
  • Thumbnail: Page 
615
    615
  • Thumbnail: Page 
616
    616
  • Thumbnail: Page 
617
    617
  • Thumbnail: Page 
618
    618
  • Thumbnail: Page 
619
    619
  • Thumbnail: Page 
620
    620
  • Thumbnail: Page 
621
    621