Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Implications of Low Growth Rates for Higher Education

Martin Trow
Higher Education
Vol. 5, No. 4 (Nov., 1976), pp. 377-396
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3445734
Page Count: 20
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
The Implications of Low Growth Rates for Higher Education
Preview not available

Abstract

The implications of low growth rates for higher education in the United States are discussed. Though some individual institutions may face financial difficulties, the problems associated with lower growth rates are likely to be organizational and educational rather than economic. Typical and possible responses to problems created by the transition from fast to slow growth are analysed, and the article ends with a discussion of important questions raised by the response to lower growth rates; the tendency towards more centralization has dangers for the diversity which is the best way of maintaining the flexibility needed to cope with an uncertain future.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377
  • Thumbnail: Page 
378
    378
  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379
  • Thumbnail: Page 
380
    380
  • Thumbnail: Page 
381
    381
  • Thumbnail: Page 
382
    382
  • Thumbnail: Page 
383
    383
  • Thumbnail: Page 
384
    384
  • Thumbnail: Page 
385
    385
  • Thumbnail: Page 
386
    386
  • Thumbnail: Page 
387
    387
  • Thumbnail: Page 
388
    388
  • Thumbnail: Page 
389
    389
  • Thumbnail: Page 
390
    390
  • Thumbnail: Page 
391
    391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
392
    392
  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
395
    395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
396
    396