Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Strategies for Assessing the Implications of Malformed Frogs for Environmental Health

James G. Burkhart, Gerald Ankley, Heidi Bell, Hillary Carpenter, Douglas Fort, David Gardiner, Henry Gardner, Robert Hale, Judy C. Helgen, Paul Jepson, Douglas Johnson, Michael Lannoo, David Lee, Joseph Lary, Rick Levey, Joseph Magner, Carol Meteyer, Michael D. Shelby and George Lucier
Environmental Health Perspectives
Vol. 108, No. 1 (Jan., 2000), pp. 83-90
DOI: 10.2307/3454299
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3454299
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Strategies for Assessing the Implications of Malformed Frogs for Environmental Health
Preview not available

Abstract

The recent increase in the incidence of deformities among natural frog populations has raised concern about the state of the environment and the possible impact of unidentified causative agents on the health of wildlife and human populations. An open workshop on Strategies for Assessing the Implications of Malformed Frogs for Environmental Health was convened on 4-5 December 1997 at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The purpose of the workshop was to share information among a multidisciplinary group with scientific interest and responsibility for human and environmental health at the federal and state level. Discussions highlighted possible causes and recent findings directly related to frog deformities and provided insight into problems and strategies applicable to continuing investigation in several areas. Possible causes of the deformities were evaluated in terms of diagnostics performed on field amphibians, biologic mechanisms that can lead to the types of malformations observed, and parallel laboratory and field studies. Hydrogeochemistry must be more integrated into environmental toxicology because of the pivotal role of the aquatic environment and the importance of fates and transport relative to any potential exposure. There is no indication of whether there may be a human health factor associated with the deformities. However, the possibility that causal agents may be waterborne indicates a need to identify the relevant factors and establish the relationship between environmental and human health in terms of hazard assessment.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90