If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Environmental Genocide: Native Americans and Toxic Waste

Daniel Brook
The American Journal of Economics and Sociology
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Jan., 1998), pp. 105-113
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3487423
Page Count: 9
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Environmental Genocide: Native Americans and Toxic Waste
Preview not available

Abstract

Physical and cultural genocide have been practiced against Native Americans for half a millennium. In the modern era, these forms of genocide have been superseded by a more insidious, and ultimately more destructive, form. Environmental genocide is perpetrated by the U.S. government and by private corporations alike; some of their methods are legal, while others are not. Against this harsh backdrop, Native Americans are more unified and are becoming better organized than ever, and they are fighting back for their very survival.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[105]
    [105]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113