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Leonhard Miksch (1901-1950): A Forgotten Member of the Freiburg School

Nils Goldschmidt and Arnold Berndt
The American Journal of Economics and Sociology
Vol. 64, No. 4 (Oct., 2005), pp. i+973-998
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3488048
Page Count: 27
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Leonhard Miksch (1901-1950): A Forgotten Member of the Freiburg School
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Abstract

German economist Leonhard Miksch's ideas on ordoliberalism have so far received little attention in the history of economic thought. This is surprising, as Miksch provides insights into the debates within the so-called "Freiburg School of Law and Economics" in its early phase and, moreover, gave impulses that were essential to the further development of this economic approach. In addition, as a close advisor to Ludwig Erhard, the "political father" of the German "Social Market Economy," his influence on German postwar economic policy was considerable. Furthermore, Miksch's thinking on the combination of market forms and market constitution, as formulated primarily in his habilitation thesis on "Competition as Task" (1937) supervised by Walter Eucken, is unique and inventive. We will show that his ideas on economic policy culminating in the reference model of "competition as-if" as well as the connection he established with the economic foundation of democracy are of enduring relevance. The latter insight characterizes Miksch as an (overlooked) precursor of constitutional economics, which was later developed independently by James M. Buchanan.

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