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The Role of Family Planning in the Reduction of Poverty

Arthur A. Campbell
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 30, No. 2, Family Planning and Fertility Control (May, 1968), pp. 236-245
DOI: 10.2307/349249
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/349249
Page Count: 10
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The Role of Family Planning in the Reduction of Poverty
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Abstract

The prevention of unwanted births would have a substantial economic impact on families living in poverty. Using conservative assumptions, the costs of family-planning programs are estimated to average 300 to prevent every unwanted birth that would otherwise have occurred. Over the years, however, the avoidance of an unwanted child would save the family an average of 8,000 in the costs of child care. It would also enable couples to add an average of 600 to their annual incomes over a four-year period by making it possible for some of the wives to work. When all of these savings and added earnings are discounted to the year in which the unwanted births were prevented, the total economic benefits average 7,800 for every $300 spent on family-planning services. The ratio of benefits to costs is 26 to 1.

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