Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Overreplication of the Origin Region in the dnaB37 Mutant of Bacillus subtilis: Postinitiation Control of Chromosomal Replication

Gilles Henckes, Francis Harper, Alain Levine, Françoise Vannier and Simone J. Séror
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 86, No. 22 (Nov. 15, 1989), pp. 8660-8664
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/34935
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Overreplication of the Origin Region in the dnaB37 Mutant of Bacillus subtilis: Postinitiation Control of Chromosomal Replication
Preview not available

Abstract

When the Bacillus subtilis dnaB37 mutant, defective in initiation, is returned to permissive temperature after accumulation of initiation proteins at 45 degrees C, we have shown, by extensive DNA· DNA hybridization analysis, that the origin region is replicated in excess (≈ 2-fold). However, this replication is limited to a region of about 120-175 kilobases on either side of the origin. This has been confirmed by autoradiographic analysis of the overreplicated region. During the second round of synchronized replication at 30 degrees C, replication in fact appears to resume from the stalled forks on either side of the origin. We propose that in B. subtilis, in addition to a first level of control at the origin, a second level of control exists downstream of the origin in order to limit overreplication of the chromosome. These two controls might normally be tightly coupled. We suggest that the second level of control is exerted through the reversible inhibition of replisome movement at specific regions on either side of the origin.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
8660
    8660
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8661
    8661
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8662
    8662
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8663
    8663
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8664
    8664