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Conjoint Therapy in Marriage Counseling

Gerald R. Leslie
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 26, No. 1 (Feb., 1964), pp. 65-71
DOI: 10.2307/349379
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/349379
Page Count: 7
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Conjoint Therapy in Marriage Counseling
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Abstract

During its early years, marriage counseling placed more emphasis on the marital relationship, stressed the use of one counselor, and made limited use of joint interviews. Marriage counselors generally failed, however, to develop the potential inherent in joint interviewing, while family therapists made increasing use of it. Conjoint therapy aids in the identification and working through of distortions, helps hold transference and counter-transference in check, quickly brings marital conflict into the open and into the counseling sessions, and emphasizes current relationship problems. Conjoint therapy is not a panacea, however. It requires new skills of counselors and is demanding work. It is probably inappropriate with some types of clients and problems.

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